nirix5: (me!)
[personal profile] nirix5
Dear Everybody,

Guess what? I don't really care that Whitney Houston died. It was weird in a 'huh' kind of way, because she's been around and part of the music scene since I was a kid. It gets the same kind of 'huh' from me that anyone does that was a household name who dies. I think the whole drug thing was a shame. Literally, I mean, throwing away a voice like that for drugs is shameful. But it's her life and she could do what she wanted with it.

Now. I am sick to death of all the displeasure that you're showing that ANYONE in the media is paying attention to her death. All of the macros with dead soldiers or starving African children going 'Whitney who?'-- are you kidding me? GET THE FUCK OVER YOURSELVES.

Just because someone had addiction problems is no reason that they can't be mourned. Guess what? Soldiers have addiction problems. People from all walks of life have addiction problems. And believing that just because someone was in entertainment means that they never did anything to help society or individuals? Is BULLSHIT. Yes. Houston never picked up a gun to serve her country. However, she did:

- break down race barriers in a restrictive industry
- operate charities supporting children with AIDS, cancer, and who are homeless
- support the United Negro College Fund, helping to send people of color to college who might otherwise not have been able to go
- record and release her Superbowl rendition of "The Star Spangled Banner", donating ALL of her share of the profits to the American Red Cross Gulf Crisis Fund
- Staged a concert specifically for soldiers and their families
- refused to do any business with any agencies supporting apartheid
- supported charities that raised apartheid awareness
- become the first major singer to perform in South Africa after apartheid, donating proceeds from her concerts to various South African charities
- re-release "The Star Spangled Banner" after 9/11, with all profits going to the New York Firefighters 9/11 Disaster Relief Fund and the New York Fraternal Order of Police

Those are just the public things. You don't know how she affected individual lives. Guess what? When I was super depressed and going through a really hard time in my life, it was not a solider who saved me. It was a musician who got me through. Now, that wasn't Houston, but who's to say that her music never touched people, never helped them through hard times? I'm sure those people are mourning her right now. And newsflash: THEY HAVE EVERY RIGHT TO.

(Just like you have every right to mourn Steve Jobs, who was a tyrant and a slave worker, literally, but hey, he didn't do drugs, so he's all right. Whatever. I wish you could see the dismissive sneer on my face right now.)

And to the people in my parents' generation who are sounding off on this on Facebook:

SHUT THE FUCK UP. SERIOUSLY? I KNOW WHAT YOU PEOPLE DID DURING THE SIXTIES AND SEVENTIES. I'VE SEEN THE PICTURES. Pot and the kettle, much?

To sum up: Death is painful, whether big or small. Everyone has the right to mourn whoever they want, however they want. You don't have the right to judge or direct them.

.

Date: 2012-03-13 03:25 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] terrorohterror.livejournal.com
one of my first thoughts after i heard about her death was that it's very sad when someone dedicates their life to entertaining, gets eaten up by the cruelty of that sort of work, receives little sympathy for being in an extremely abusive relationship and having drug problems, and finally dies too young and in such a wasteful way. i respect human life! it's disgusting how being an "icon" can make someone vulnerable for all sorts of terrible comments and insensitivity.

i didn't know she was so active politically, thanks for posting!

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